Sunday, January 30, 2011

Its All In What You See


























Three years ago I wrote 'Silk Stockings' from what a friend said to me. A sultry piece I do with Flora Newberry and her trumpet. Did it last night at Dr. Lou's Open Mic, and all memory. I almost want to pass out cigars and bourbon before I perform it. Get the room smoky I say.

So, here is another 'Said So' style piece...when Pasquale called me from a Philly neighborhood...needs work, I was putting Pearl's assonance to use...I may have gotten carried away on this train...heh!

Backseat View


A brick house with Groucho Marx eyes caught the attention of a gray and dark January day   speaking with his funny cigar smile down steep allies when shots rang out blocks away  police lead a young boy away in cuffs  past the old factory lot where confederate soldiers tame picket lines   electrical inspectors always intended to move families further north where legacy of grass is a lighter shade of green houses are colorless and everyone knows crime pays   hear the buildings whisper through bleeding eyes   journey through the burning brain smells fame  worker ants do not build them like they used to headlines claim   those fancy Groucho Marx eyes and funny cigar smiles


[Artwork Photo- Cheryl Tall]

8 comments:

Jeanne said...

It's a great sound picture.

Jim K. said...

Cool...Derek Motion has a similar
style. The length is really
here...a lot to string together
and the personal space to string it.

Chef E said...

Jim- I love checking these poets out, and Derek is one to follow. I have re-written a poem in my second book in honor of him. This one may follow.

Jim K. said...

ur a wild 1

..meant to say..the length is
really nice

Jessie Carty said...

Fun E! I live when you write characters :)

Marcus Goodyear said...

There is a lot to admire here! I'm not usually one for poems without line breaks, but this one totally works.

My favorite is the opening personification of the house looking down the alleys.

Chef E said...

Marcus- its a form of prose with line breaks in between each line, as opposed to punctuation...Jim told me about this poet who uses them, Derek Motion, so I thought I would give it a try...Thanks!

Anonymous said...

sometimes googling yourself pays off...