Monday, April 25, 2011

Poetry On The Porch





















I had the honor of attending 'Poetry On The Porch' at the Alice Paul Institute, organized by Erika Kelly, a poet I met three or four years ago through blogging. She began working with me on my writing as an editor. Then we began to appear in local circles together. She is a wonderful writer in her own right and I am glad to be able to support her. Erika organizes this event-

National Poetry Month is a month-long, national celebration of poetry established by the Academy of American Poets. The concept is to widen the attention of individuals and the media—to the art of poetry, to living poets, to our complex poetic heritage, and to poetry books and journals of wide aesthetic range and concern. We hope to increase the visibility and availability of poetry in popular culture while acknowledging and celebrating poetry’s ability to sustain itself in the many places where it is practiced and appreciated.

The Alice Paul Institute is a not-for-profit 501(c)3 corporation based in Mount Laurel, New Jersey. It was founded in 1984 by a group of dedicated volunteers to commemorate the centennial of Alice Paul's 1885 birth and to further her legacy. The organization was operated by volunteers for more than a decade. Today, four staff members, as well as volunteers, oversee the daily business and special events at Paulsdale.
















After Annmarie Lockhart, Joanie DiMartino, Paloma Amar, and Erika Kelly read I was given the chance to read. I chose a few new poems but decided to read a poem I had written when I was only 15 years old. A memory that stood out in my head still to this day, and had revised it a few times, but the original just works. Most of our mothers and grandmothers did not use dried seasonings, nor did we own any bottles. They used only fresh ingredients bought from the market, or used what they had on hand. It occurred to me my mom seasoned her food with 'Depression', something she suffered from her whole life, up until she passed away.

(Poems are removed after three days...)

7 comments:

Toon said...

My mother seasoned with depression and fatigue too -- as well as fatigue. It gave everything a blandness that I sometimes found comforting and sometimes found infuriating. Love this poem!

jemajo said...

"life's dish of hard lessons..."

Loved that line! Great poem.

farmlady said...

Great poem, Elizabeth. I love the repetition of the "one, two, three" and then the "one, two, three, four." at the end.
Powerful!
Good one to read...

keri said...

Great photos, you look comfortable behind a podium. Not my strong suit, of course if I would write some beautiful poetry, maybe I wouldn't find it as difficult.

That beans and cornbread recipe is slammin. We love beans and cornbread and we love new recipes, so this ones a keeper.

I'm learning more about you every week, who knew you were such a fan of human torture? Turning off comments on your other blog is evidence of that. :) later, keri

Chef E said...

Heh! Keri you crack me up! See ya on facebook...

jemajo- thanks I get that now and then, and they are hard to chew aren't they :)

Toon- I meet so many people who have gone through it, it does leave a hole in you...

Thanks farmlady, I realize many moms had up to six or seven, but people get it after hearing it a few times...

Debbie said...

I'm so proud of you and all you are doing! Loved this poem and that you wrote it when 15? (with some revisions now) wow. Just shows what an artist you have always been. :)

Chef E said...

Thanks Deb- no revisions on this one, I did three different versions, but went back to my original, it just worked.